As I sit to write critically of Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy — Definitive Edition (GTA: DE) I can not help but think of Vito Corleone, deploring the killing of her son in The Godfather by Francis Ford Coppola. I think a lot of thirty-minded who grew up with Grand Theft Auto regard these games as more than just nuggets born happy teenage nostalgia sunny Saturday afternoons spent inside. They are part of the foundation that has enabled us to become the players we are today. And so we keep close to our hearts, as if they were a long-lost friend.

That being said, I can see why GTA: DE is currently with one of the lowest users of the scores ever recorded in the history of Metacritic. Fans of the unique interpretation, bizarre and extravagant Rock star of the American dream feel like they were duped, deceived, duped — if you like — thinking that this collection is really the final way to play three of the most popular games in history. And I hate to say it, but their feelings are not entirely unjustified.

I think it is important to keep in mind that Rock star has released GTA: DE as a collection which will retain the look and feel of the original while adding some quality of life improvements and visual enhancements for the ride. And to their credit, I think they almost hit the goal. There are times when the streets loaded with neon Vice City or sunlight cascading San Andreas illuminate scenes in a way I never thought possible. And vehicles now have a distinctive brilliance that makes it a useful work by reflecting light. While everything else in the street (the windows of buildings, for example) lack the same kind of information, creating an awkward hodgepodge of old and new that screams a lack of direction.

The character models are also unbalanced mess. Claude GTA III appears to have been created generations before the CJ San Andes. Ken Rosenberg of Vice City seems to have been rearranged with a shovel. And do not get me started on the NPC — most of which look like real goblins youd see in The Lord of the Rings.

Now, I could look past all this nonsense if GTA: DE had made an effort to modernize its gameplay somewhat. Im not saying that Grove Street Games was to make them work as GTA V, but I feel they have made a conscious effort to come to work, adapt as little as possible and call it a day.

While the additions of checkpoints and quick load times are a boon for people who hated having to replay an entire mission in case of failure, other changes could have been made to the gameplay seems to the best minimal. The three games still play as if they were twenty years old — and not in a good way. Heres the thing, though; Its easy to look back with rose-colored glasses, remembering how these games work well as a child, but the fact is they do not have. There was always a widespread level bank throughout the series, throughout the fourth installment, and for better or for worse, GTA: DE keeps everything weird and then some.

Grand Theft Auto: The Trilogy--Definitive Edition Review

Much of this comes controls (apparently) updated. Of course, there is a wheel of weapons that you can use to quickly select your next instrument of destruction. But thats about all there is for improvement. Make no mistake, these three games are played exactly as it was twenty years ago. Aiming is slippery and imprecise, even with the activated automatic locking function. And the lack of impact when firing your weapons frustrating is made by the choice of the developer to give up using vibration of the controller.

It is not only the absence of a real update commands or visual. GTA: DE is plagued with technical problems, ranging from audio and serious pop-in hiccups tear inexcusable screen and falls frequency of confusing images. There is no reason why these games require us to choose between performance modes or loyalty, and Rock star should quite frankly be ashamed that they function as badly as they do. Even on performance tuning, you would have the chance to spend 15 seconds without seeing the drop in frame rate.

Here is the thing, however; Despite all the problems that the GTA suffers: from, I have had a good time with. Which simply testifies to the quality of the writing of the Grand Theft Auto series. The GTA: DE needs a hotfix. Or, maybe, he needs a cargo patch. However, I always find myself to appreciate the exaggerated intrigues, ridiculous dialogues and the scandalous mission structure. It is difficult to call them definitive, but always easy to call them classic.